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STEWART LIBRARY ANNUAL REPORT :  2002/03

Area Reports

 

I. OVERVIEW

Once again this was a year filled with opportunities - opportunities to enhance the collection, improve and expand services, upgrade technology, and increase private gifts. Over 16,000 volumes, 1,651 videos, 425 CD’s, and over 4600 new electronic resources were added to the collection. Use of our electronic resources is reflected in the number of visitor sessions on the library's website. Visitor sessions increased more than 13% this past year, averaging over 27,000 sessions per month for an annual total of 326,378 sessions. Nearly 8,100 individuals received instruction on using library and information resources, an increase of 12% over last year. Computers in the public areas were upgraded and remote access to electronic resources was improved.

After nearly two years of discussion and planning, the redesign of our new website was completed. Usability testing of the new site was conducted during Fall and Spring semesters. Based on the comments received, additional changes will be made and the site further refined and enhanced prior to the beginning of school this coming August.

Planning for the library/information commons at the new Davis campus continued throughout the year. Equipment, shelving, and a security system have been ordered and books purchased. Library services at the Davis campus will be provided by two new staff positions; library faculty will provide information literacy instruction.

Other accomplishments included completing a self-study in preparation for the University’s 2004 accreditation review by the Northwest Association of Schools and Colleges. The self-study addresses the library section of NASC’s Standard Five: Library and Information Resources. The self-study report and the exhibits required for Standard Five will be finalized later this summer. A marketing plan for the library was developed and aspects of the plan will be implemented during the coming year. The library also received approval for a new one credit-hour information literacy course: LibSci TD2704: Information Resources in the Business Disciplines, which will be required for all Business Administration majors. The course was developed by Shaun Speigel, in collaboration with faculty in the Business Administration Department.

The library continues to benefit greatly from the generosity of the university community and other donors. Of the 425 university employees who gave in 2002/03, 95 directed their gifts to the library, second only to the 111 who gave to athletics. During the past year, 748 gifts totaling $176,328 were received. Additionally, a Library Services & Technology Assistance (LSTA) proposal written by John Lamborn was funded, providing over $48,000 for workstations in the library and at the Davis information commons.

Last October, the library and over 200 guests celebrated the second annual Utah Construction/Utah International Symposium. The symposium featured a photographic exhibit, Mining in the West, comprised of nearly 100 photographs from the UC/UI Collection, a reception, and a lecture by Dr. Thomas G. Alexander, the Lemuel Hardison Redd Jr. Professor of Western American History, Brigham Young University. The online version of the photographic exhibit is available on the library’s website (library.weber.edu/ucc). As part of the Symposium, the library published a book written by Gene Sessions and Sterling Sessions, Utah International a Biography of a Business. Copies of the book were gifted to members of the company’s founding families and to a number of academic libraries.

In February, the library hosted an extensive Latinos in Utah photographic exhibit compiled by University of Utah Professor Armando Solorzano. The exhibit opened at the Utah State Capitol Rotunda last fall and is currently touring universities in the West and in Mexico and will be at the Smithsonian later in the year.

Service enhancements during the past year included:

  • Increasing the number of electronic resources and continuing to improve the onsite collection
  • Redesigning the library’s website to make it more intuitive to users
  • As part of a national consortium, initiating 24/7 live-chat reference service
  • Offering more sections of the Internet Navigator to better meet student needs
  • Relocating the M (Music) books and periodicals collection to the lower level, adjacent to the music media collection. The relocation was requested by the Music Department and strongly endorsed by accreditation reviewers during the department’s latest accreditation review.
  • Expanding the Document Delivery Service to provide library owned and interlibrary loan materials to faculty and staff on campus and at WSU Davis.
  • Improving interlibrary loan service by fully implementing the ILLiad interlibrary loans management system

* * * * * * * * *

II. MISSION & GOALS

The Stewart Library’s mission is to:

1. Advance the instructional, scholarship, and community service mission of the University through the development of on-site collections, access to off-site resources, personalized assistance in the use of library and information resources, and instruction on research strategies and tools, and

2. Assess the services we provide and the relevancy and use of the collections and use assessment outcomes to continually improve our resources and services.

Ongoing, primary goals:

  • Continue to improve library resources and services and assess their relevancy and use
  • Leverage existing and emerging technology to foster the development of library collections and services which support WSU teaching and learning
  • Augment the library’s budget by increasing private funding.

2003/04 Objectives in Support of the Ongoing Goals:

  • Assess the effectiveness of library resources and services using the qualitative and quantitative approach provided in ACRL’s Standards for College Libraries, 2000 Edition.
  • Promote the inclusion of online library resources and services in the university’s web-based and web-enhanced learning systems
  • Provide high-quality library services at WSU-Davis and assess the effectiveness of those services
  • Implement the circulation of media materials to WSU student, faculty and staff
  • Conduct a user survey in Spring, 2004, to assess student satisfaction with library resources and services
  • Provide website access to information on each of the library’s for-credit courses
  • Re-engineer Reference & Information Services to serve patrons better and to use staff more effectively in a changing, increasingly technological environment
  • Collaborate closely with the Development Office and the Office of Sponsored Projects to increase by at least 10% the number of grants and proposals written on behalf of the library.

Departmental goals congruent with the library's mission and the objectives stated above are also established each year and are included in the Library Services section of the Report.

* * * * * * * * *

III. LEARNING OUTCOMES

The library has identified the following student learning outcomes:

Students will be able to:

    • Use information resources effectively
    • Identify appropriate types of information for academic research
    • Find and access information using catalogs, databases, and search engines
    • Critically evaluate information sources
    • Correctly document information sources
    • Understand how to access and use information ethically and legally
    • Understand and support the principles of intellectual freedom

These outcomes are assessed throughout the semester through a variety of written assignments, short quizzes, oral presentations, exams, and a final project in which students demonstrate their ability to identify, access, evaluate, and use information resources effectively. Our student end of course evaluation form has been revised to incorporate more questions relating to our assessment outcomes.

In addition to its for credit courses, the library annually provides instruction sessions for English 2010 and First Year Experience classes in which students complete an assignment demonstrating their ability to effectively use library databases and internet resources. The library also provides course-integrated instruction sessions for which academic faculty and subject librarians collaborate on the information to be covered. Students demonstrate their ability to use subject-specific resources in the research papers required for the course.

The library’s student learning outcomes mesh effectively with parts of several of the 2002-03 Academic Affairs Student Learning Outcomes and mesh particularly closely with outcome number 3:

Effective intellectual skills and behaviors for the acquisition, analysis, application and communication of information, including:

    • Effective oral, visual and written communication skills
    • The use of quantitative and qualitative analysis to solve problems
    • Critical, analytical, creative, and evaluative thinking skills
    • The ability to transform information into knowledge and knowledge into judgment and action

* * * * * * * * *

IV. ASSESSMENT

The library is committed to systematically assessing its services and resources. Student and faculty satisfaction with library resources and services is assessed using the following methods:

  • Student end of course evaluations
  • Biennial student and faculty satisfaction surveys
  • Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory. Administered every three years by the University
  • Biennial interviews with approximately 200 students who are using the library
  • Focus groups - both ongoing and as needed.

Student evaluations are collected for all for credit library courses, English 2010 and FYE sessions, and for a representative number of subject specific sessions. Based on student evaluations, library faculty routinely revise and improve the courses they teach and, in consultation with English and FYE faculty, English 2010 and FYE sessions are revised each semester. Evaluation data collected during the past year continue to indicate a high level of student satisfaction with library instruction.

The library’s involvement in the Association of Research Libraries SAILS (Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) assessment with ten other academic libraries, will provide national comparative data - something we’ve wanted for a very long time. This past Spring semester over 370 WSU students took the SAILS test. Test results comparing our students’ scores to students across the country will be available later this year.

Biennial surveys and interviews to assess user satisfaction with library resources and services have been ongoing since 1997/98. Student satisfaction with the services provided in Access Services and Reference & Information Services was most recently assessed in October, 2002. Results from the 2002 survey indicate that between 87-98% of those completing the survey were highly satisfied with reference services and resources (percentage varies with specific question.) The high-level of student satisfaction with the assistance they receive, the friendliness and approachability of personnel, of services in general, and of weekday service hours remains stable. Of the service areas surveyed, the Student Computer Lab(has moved to Lampros Hall) showed the greatest overall gains in level of user satisfaction. Of particular note were increases in satisfaction with personnel, quality of assistance provided, the number and quality of PC’s in the lab, access to a scanner and zip drives, and the overall suitability of the work stations.

Assessing the relevancy, strengths and weaknesses of the collection and consulting with faculty in developing and managing the collection are expected responsibilities for bibliographers and the basis on which their collection management decisions are made. Faculty routinely indicate they are extremely pleased with the assistance they receive from their bibliographer and with the ongoing progress being made to improve the collections. The improvements made to the collection during the past year are reflected in the Table on page 8.

In addition to its biennial user surveys, student satisfaction levels with library staff, resources, and services are assessed in the Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory (SSI), which the University has administered since 1996. The SSI administered in Spring 2003 continued to indicate a higher level of student satisfaction with the library than in 1997.

Suggestions from library users provide another ongoing source of assessment data. A suggestion box is located in the main lobby and a "suggestion link" is on the library's website. Suggestions are collected regularly and, when practicable, implemented. Suggestions made during the past year covered a broad spectrum, ranging from additions to the collection, expanding the Auxiliary Computer Lab(has moved to Lampros Hall) on the second floor, installing [baby] changing stations and sensor lights in restrooms, changing computer set-ups so that pornographic sites could not be set up as the default homepage on library computers, and relaxing the restrictions on eating and drinking in the public areas of the building. These suggestions, and many others, have been implemented.

In addition to conducting another User Satisfaction Survey, our assessment efforts in the coming year will again focus on comprehensive usability and accessibility testing of the library's redesigned website. Website usage statistics indicate an ever increasing number of students use the web to access library resources, making it essential that the new website be as intuitive and user-friendly as possible. Improving the re-designed site will be an ongoing process and will be based on information obtained from the usability studies.

* * * * * * * * *

V. STAFF

A number of personnel changes occurred during the past year. We welcome those who have joined us and are sorry when people leave.

New arrivals:

Holly Bowden - Cataloging Assistant

Retirements and Resignations:

Ruby Licona, Reference and Instruction Librarian
Peggy Smith, Cataloging Assistant
Kathy Thiriot, Office Specialist

Tenured:
No one was reviewed for tenure in 2002/03.

At the end of the 2002/03 year the library had 43.45 FTE positions.

VI. UTILIZATION OF RESOURCES and SERVICES -

The table below illustrates the use of on site and online library resources and services.

Utilization of Resources and Services

2002/2003

2001/2002

2000/2001

1999/2000

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1995/96

1994/95

Circulation Statistics

147,329

145,879

148,583

146,818

145,920*

161,684

157,757

153,820

145,799

Web Site Visitor Sess.

326,378

288,339

250,729

188,047

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Reference/Research Assist.  

      No. of Questions

12,276

12,670

15,931

20,417

24,412*

30,303

36,642

37,060

32,625

User Assistance

      No. of Questions

38,723

34,108

34,668

Instructional Sessions

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

      Subject Specific

117

2,419

159

2,902

163

3,045

134

2,529

116

2,251

102

1,778

92

1,444

95

1,501

71

1,433

      English 2010

101

2,152

100

2,199

96

2,248

96

2,091

97

2,062

78

1,783

75

1,657

91

1,900

78

1,560

      FYE (First Year Exp.)

29

609

19

383

28

595

35

727

31

709

21

420

24

330

      Other

33

442

24

260

46

970

36

498

35

610

59

745

85

1,216

21

394

29

580

                            Totals:

280

5,622

302

5,744

333

7,191

301

5,845

279

5,632

260

4,726

276

4,647

207

3,795

178

3,573

      For Credit Classes

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

13

351

9

251

11

300

15

460

14

245

20

408

16

418

25

488

21

449

      Internet Navigator

18

2046

11

1173

7

523

EReserve

      Faculty

161

158

157

       Items Available

3,452

2,557

1,876

      Page Visitors

44,525

37,774

10,274**

Interlibrary Loan

      Lending Requests

8,847

8,805

7,682

6,089

5,909

5,551

5,099

5,654

5,353

      Borrowing Requests

4,351

4,338

4,560

3,861

3,735

4,099

3,054

3,651

3,634

*Decreases reflect the University’s change from quarters to semesters in 1998/99.
**Figure is for Spring semester 2001 only, earlier figures not available.

As indicated in the table, there was a 13% increase in the number of visitors to the library’s website and nearly an 18% increase in the number of page visits to EReserve. The 1% increase in circulation results from a decrease in the use of the current issues of printed journals, which follows a national trend and confirms that students and faculty prefer to use ejournals when given a choice, offset by and an increase in the use of books and videos. Contrary to the decreases in the use of their book collections that other academic libraries in Utah are experiencing, the use of our book collection continues to increase. While “user assistance” types of questions answered at the various service desks increased by nearly 13%, the number of reference/research questions answered continued to decline, but more slowly than in previous years. The ongoing decline is attributable, in part, to an easier, more stable method of remote access and a more information literate student body. More for credit classes were taught and three adjuncts were hired to help meet student demand for the Internet Navigator. Enrollment in the Navigator increased from 1173 to 2046, nearly 75%. Fewer subject specific sessions were offered due to the resignation of one faculty member and the sabbaticals of two others.

VII. BUDGET

The library receives operating funds from three sources:

(i) Education & General (E&G) monies allocated to WSU, both ongoing and one-time
(ii) State monies allocated to the Utah Academic Library Consortium (UALC)
(iii) Gifts

Stewart Library Budget

2002/2003

2001/2002

2000/2001

1999/2000

1998/1999

1997/1998

1996/1997

1995/1996

1994/1995

E & G Base:

   Salaries

1,471,594

1,483,766

1,379,951

1,304,235

1,238,049

1,214,231

1,083,262

1,048,014

976,151

   Information Resources

987,217

1,066,347

1,066,314

1,084,314

966,476

794,973

784,015

810,736

700,000

   Operations

0

0

18,000

25,560

60,000

100,292

92,013

75,000

50,368

   Hourly Wages

25,000

12,945

29,203

34,169

54,169

87,288

84,746

76,164

73,731

   Travel

0

0

0

0

8,500

8,500

8,500

8,500

8,500

   Benefits

561,330

564,931

526,864

498,514

450,302

444,543

418,843

404,899

377,205

          Total:

3,045,141

3,127,989

3,020,332

2,946,792

2,777,496

2,649,827

2,471,379

2,423,313

2,185,955

Legislative One-Time:*

55,800

UALC

   One-time/Ongoing*

219,204

220,606

183,000

183,000

183,000

183,000

155,900

UALC

   One-time (non-ongoing)

27,500

      Horizon Software

25,431.72

5,731.55

      Horizon Hardware

86,540.23

22,634.50

            Server

(64,263.00)

            PC's

21,132.90

21,300.00

                  Total:

140,338

Total includes 1995-1997

Gifts:

176,329

571,840

423,061

366,166

595,410

281,336

421,820

215,276

110,269

                   Totals:

3,440,674

3,947,935

3,626,393

3,495,958

3,611,706

3,114,163

2,893,199

2,934,827

2,296,224

*For information resources

E&G
Ongoing E&G monies to support library resources, services, and staffing increased from $2,185,955 in 1994/95 to $3,045,141 in 2002/03, a 39.3% increase. The $82,848 decrease in E&G funds this year reflects a university-wide decrease in legislative funding.

UALC
Ongoing funds of $219,204 were received from UALC.

GIFTS
Private gifts are an increasingly significant source of funding for the library without which many of the improvements made to the collection, library technology, and the building would not have been possible. Since 1994/95, the library has received $3,161,507 in private gifts.

Significant gifts received in 2002/03 included: the Waterstradt Endowment ($12,000) and the Celebrate Shakespeare! Endowment ($10,000). Additionally, more than $27,000 in cash gifts and $44,354 in gifts-in-kind were received from members of the Friends of the Stewart Library.

The library's fund raising efforts are supported by its faculty and staff. During the past year, 85% of the faculty and 72% of the staff donated to the library. We hope to increase that by 10% before the end of next year.

As illustrated in the table, the total library budget from all three sources has increased substantially, rising from $2,296,224 in 1994/95 to $3,440,647 in 2002/03, an overall increase of 50%.

* * * * * * * * *

VIII. LIBRARY COLLECTIONS: IMPROVEMENTS & RELEVANCY (Collection Management)

An ongoing, primary goal for the library is to provide the information resources needed to support the instructional and scholarship mission of the university. How well this goal is met is determined by a number of factors including collection size and growth rate, relevancy of the collection to the institution's instructional programs, currency of resources, and user perceptions of the resources available.

Library Holdings

2002/03

2001/02

2000/01

1999/2000

1998/99

1997/98

1996/97

1995/96

1994/95

1993/94

Bound Volumes*

509,597

493,744

479,225

458,115

436,431

418,497

403,206

388,947**

370,987

359,892

Electronic Resources***

197,761

192,937

192,782

190,628

189,128

17,613

N/A

N/A

N/A

400

Journals (Current Print Subscriptions)

2,353

2,331

2,309

2,278

2,248

2,224

2,196

2,100

2,062

2,056

Government Publications (Unbound)

225,411

219,690

218,006

215,277

212,468

210,222

208,338

206,001

198,001

197,301

Audio Recordings

9,794

9,406

9,084

9,015

8,923

8,399

8,319

8,083

2,908

2,593

Video Recordings

8,363

6,712

5,708

5,088

4,380

3,458

3,137

2,755

2,516

N/A

Maps

64,894

64,529

63,352

61,988

61,300

60,063

59,373

58,849

59,603

57,181

Microforms (Fiche and Film)

584,461

563,362

540,194

515,370

492,899

471,729

453,390

441,780

425,007

N/A

Kits

786

749

678

668

646

624

590

573

589

553

CD-ROMs

1,552

1,381

1,149

948

503

500

493

38

32

30

*Includes books, bound periodicals and bound Government Documents.

**Based on a physical count of the collection completed 11/95.
***Based on data provided by the Utah Academic Library Consortium. Figures listed are system wide totals representing the sum total of electronic books, indices, and journals to which each UALC library has access.

Using a combination of E&G, UALC, and gift funds, the size of the print and video collection increased substantially again this past year. The number of electronic resources available to students and faculty at all Utah institutions of higher education continues to expand, as does the number of e-resources added by individual libraries. The library increased its electronic subscriptions by approximately 200 titles and continues to consult with faculty in canceling subscriptions to additional print journals and reference sources as titles become available online. The 25% growth in the video/DVD collection corresponds with the increasing use of that collection - up more than 34% over the previous year.

To ensure that the resources added to the collection are relevant to curricular needs, subject bibliographers continue to expand their liaison efforts, meeting with faculty in each of the colleges during the past year. As a result of this collaboration, the collection is increasingly more focused and relevant to the curriculum.

Based on the results of various user satisfaction surveys and ongoing assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the electronic, print, and video collections, we believe good progress is being made in improving the quality and relevancy of the collection. We also believe providing subject specific instruction to inform students and faculty of library resources available in their areas of interest is essential if those resources are to be used. During the past year, 117 subject specific instruction sessions were taught at the request of faculty in 29 different academic departments. The decrease in the number of sessions offered this past year is due to the resignation of Ruby Licona and the sabbaticals of Wade Kotter and John Sillito. With their return and the hiring of a new Health & Life Sciences Librarian that number will undoubtedly increase to at least 160 sessions in the coming year.

Collection Management Goals for 2002/03:

  • In consultation with faculty, continue to assess and improve the electronic, print and media collections.
  • In consultation with faculty, continue to analyze the print and electronic full-text journal collection and cancel print subscriptions for titles available online whenever possible.
  • Promote and facilitate the use of the collections by emphasizing faculty liaison activities and providing subject-specific instruction.

* * * * * * * * *


IX. SCHOLARLY AND PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES

The library is committed to supporting professional growth opportunities for faculty and staff. During the past year all library faculty and 93% of the staff attended conferences or workshops that were directly relevant to their various roles within the university and the library. This level of activity speaks highly of their professionalism and commitment to improving.

In addition to attending conferences and workshops, library faculty engaged in the following scholarly activities:

Publications:

Carol Hansen
" Internet Resources on Dance,” College and Research Libraries News, December 2002

Wade Kotter
Review of “The World in a Box,” College and Research Libraries, January 2003
Review of “Sacrificing Truth,” Choice, March 2003

Presentations:

Carol Hansen and Roxanne Hinds, “The Matthew Shepard Scholarship: Origin, Conflict and Resolution,” 7th Annual Shepard Symposium on Social Justice, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming, March 2003.

...and David Eisler, “Using the Best Practices Characteristics to Evaluate an Information Literacy Program.” Invited presentation for Best Practices in Information Literacy: Assessing Your Program preconference held at the Association of College and Research Libraries conference, Charlotte, North Carolina, April 2003.

...and Eve Tallman and Sally Patrick, “Planning Priorities for Serving Online and Distance Learners: A Dialogue for Academic and Public Librarians,” Utah Library Association Annual Conference, Sandy, Utah, May 2003.

John Sillito

“The Trappists Come to Utah: Founding Holy Trinity Abbey, 1947-50,” Pacific Coast Branch, American Historical Association annual meeting, Tucson, August 2002.

“Mainstays of the Liturgical Life: Episcopal Women in Utah,” Utah State Historical Society, annual meeting, Salt Lake City, August 2002.

“Something Mysterious and in a Certain Way Unacceptable: Thomas Merton’s Unfolding Views on Death,” Utah Academy, annual meeting, Ogden, April 2003.

Grants:

John Lamborn

  • LSTA Assistive Technology Grant. Utah State Library, March 2003. $48,440.
  • ARCC - Mobile Disability Station. WSU, May 2003. $4,980.
  • “Training in Strategic Planning for Life-Cycle Fund and Technology Replacement,” Dee Family Technology Award. WSU, June 2003. $2,021.

JaNae Kinikin and Shaun Adamson

  • “Using GIS in Marketing Research,” WSU HETI, November 2002. $1,279.
  • "A Survey of Carnegie Classification Master’s Colleges and Universities I & II to Evaluate Geographic Information Systems (GIS) Utilization within the Libraries at these Institutions,” Mountain Plains Library Association, October 2002. $600.

Sabbaticals:

John Sillito - Spring, 2002.
Wade Kotter - Spring, 2002

X. STRENGTHS and CHALLENGES

Strengths of the library include:

  • It's faculty and staff - their strong public service ethic and commitment to helping patrons
  • The ongoing improvements that are being made to the print and electronic collections
  • UALC funding and consortia e-resources
  • Significantly improving off-campus access to our e-resources
  • Systematic assessment process that informs efforts to improve services and enhance resources
  • Information literacy focus of our instruction program
  • User satisfaction

Some of the challenges we face and intend to work on during the coming year include:

  • Increasing outside funding to help offset the decreases in E&G funds
  • Too few positions. It is a significant challenge to provide the "services of the future" and, at the same time and with fewer people, continue the traditional services students and faculty still want and expect
  • Maintaining the quality of our services in meeting expanding needs. The information literacy requirement has significantly increased the demand for library classes and the opening of WSU-Davis will increase demands for services
  • Providing the programming and technical support needed for library web-enhanced and online courses and to maintain and enhance the hundreds of pages included in the library's website. As we become increasingly reliant on technology, additional technical and programming assistance is essential
  • Finding funding to address the renovation of the library building and its deteriorating infra-structure once the remodeling of Lampros Hall is completed and Multimedia Services relocated

* * * * * * * * *

XI. LIBRARY SERVICES

The following section of the Report briefly describes the accomplishments of library departments during the past year and lists departmental goals for the coming year.

* * * * * * * * *


ARCHIVES and SPECIAL COLLECTIONS

The past year proved to be a busy and successful one for both departments. On-site and off-site research use of the collection increased both in terms of numbers of researcher, and research and reference requests. As we continue to add new collections, and process those which we have had for sometime, this usage will increase.

Records documenting Weber, Davis and Morgan counties continue to be the core of our non-print holdings in Special Collections. Several new additions are documented later in this report. At the same time, the Utah Construction/Utah International Collection continues to be important, attracting researchers and requiring on- going staff support. In that regard, Archives and Special Collections personnel continue to work closely with staff in other areas of the library on a variety of events related to UC/UI. Most importantly was last year’s mining exhibit and symposium featuring Dr. Thomas G. Alexander. While much of our activity continues to revolve around the Utah Construction/Utah International Collection, we have not lost sight of our responsibility as a center for the study of local history and have added numerous printed and manuscript materials that enhance this central role.

During the past year Special Collections added 101 linear feet, and another 160 linear feet were added to Archives. Significant additions in Special Collections include the Ann Wattis Bowman Michaels Collection, Records of the Utah State Peace Society, Ogden Paint, Oil and Glass company stock book, Ogden Bench Canal and Water company records, Charles A. McCarthy collection, Bruce T. Mitchell papers on Utah International, and the Lynn Parker Skiing scrapbook. In addition we continue to pursue important published items in our collecting areas. With the recent resignation of Provost David Eisler, Archives personnel will be working closely with the interim provost to ensure that important records are transferred to Archives.

Gifts in kind continue to enhance both the general collections and Special Collections, while duplicates sold at the annual booksale serve as a source of modest income for the library. During the past year a total of 4475 books, 37 videos and 288 audio recordings valued at $44,710 were received from 128 different donors. Of these donations 968 books, 51 videos and 83 audio recordings were added to the collection, representing approximately 25% of the total donations received.

During the past year, Special Collections hosted a total of 41 events and outreach activities which brought 2566 people into the library. These included events sponsored by the Stewart Library, Friends of the Stewart Library and programs co-sponsored with the Colleges of Arts and Humanities and Social and Behavioral Sciences, the History and English departments, Honors, Women’s Studies, and the National Undergraduate Literature Conference. As part of our out-reach efforts Special Collections served as the venue for an extensive photographic exhibit on Latinos in Utah.

In addition to the activities of the Archivist and Curator of Special Collections documented elsewhere, staff in both departments continue to be involved in a variety of professional activities: Sarah Langsdon attended and participated in a panel discussion at the CIMA annual meeting in Logan; Patti Umscheid attended the same conference while also completing several photographic training sessions; Briana Beckstrand attended the Utah Library Association annual conference; and Joy Hunt registered for a variety of job-related campus workshops. We look forward to a continuing commitment to professional activity in the coming year.

Archives and Special Collections Goals for 2003/04:

All goals listed in last year’s report were either met or are currently in the process of being met. Of particular importance among those goals are the steps we have taken to create a departmental webpage, enter manuscript collections in the online catalog, continue photographic documentation of campus events, and developing a better system for keeping statistics on gift materials.

Departmental goals for the coming year include:

1. Begin the planning process for the relocation of Archives and Special Collections.

2. Refine our physical and intellectual control of the materials in both departments.

3. Expand the number of opportunities for digitizing resources.

4. Continue efforts to increase public awareness of both departments, and to increase our research usage.

5. Increase efforts in soliciting significant materials documenting our areas of collecting interest.

* * * * * * * * *

BIBLIOGRAPHIC SERVICES - (Cataloging, Acquisitions, Processing)

Once again this year, Bibliographic Services had an extremely productive year, cataloging and processing over 16,000 new volumes, 1,651 new videos, and 425 new CDs. Because of the efficiency and productivity of the cataloging staff, the vacant cataloger’s position has not been filled. Subject bibliographers are happy with the improvements in the ordering process whereby all requests are thoroughly checked against the online catalog and ordered within one week. On average, new resources are cataloged, processed and available to patrons within two weeks of receipt.

Due to our group of dedicated and hard-working students, journal, newspaper, and government publications check-in, preparation for binding, and plastic covering of paperbacks have shown significant improvement.

The department finished during the year a number of time-consuming projects on which it had been working, including bar-coding and linking of microforms, transfer of the Master’s Project collection from the Education Department to the library, cleaned from the database all records indicating “checked out by Cataloging Department,’’ and canceled or reordered all items which were not received from the vendor within a reasonable time period.

Additional projects worked on included cataloging of electronic resources purchased either by UALC or the library, cataloging of materials from Hill Field Air Force Base, and copy or original cataloging of Chinese films purchased recently. The department is also in the process of cataloging Government Document maps, almost 3000 of which have been cataloged and processed and evaluating kits in the Curriculum Collection and either withdrawing or cataloging the kits. The Mona Smith Collection has been merged with Special Collections; and part of the Young People’s collection of reference books has been merged with the General Reference Collection. The project to bar-code and link all microfilms and microfiche and rearranged them in call number order was completed.

Database clean-up work continued throughout the year. All 590 holding fields were deleted and replaced with copy records, and more than 400 negative bar-codes were deleted and replaced with regular bar-codes. In addition to the on-going inventory of the general collection the Young People’s, Curriculum and General Reference Collection were inventories and the database records corrected.

Departmental goals for the previous year were met.

Bibliographic Services Goals for 2002/03:

  1. Ensure that all materials are ordered, received and cataloged in a timely manner
  2. Continue to ensure the accuracy and integrity of the library’s database
  3. Continue to catalog maps and manuscripts and complete the cataloging of Hill Field materials and the collection of Chinese language films
  4. Select a qualified company to do the authority work for the library’s database
  5. Learn more about Horizon to take advantage of new releases and upgrades.
  6. Continue to utilize Internet discussion groups and professional literature to keep up-to-date with technical changes.

* * * * * * * * *

INFORMATION LITERACY

The Information Literacy Team continued to work diligently over the past year to develop our information literacy program to support the mission of the university and the library. The program has been developed to comply with ACRL and AAHE's national standards and ACRL's best practices guidelines. Our program was selected to be highlighted at the Best Practices preconference at the ACRL national conference in Charlotte, NC. Provost David Eisler and Carol Hansen delivered a presentation to over fifty librarians from around the USA and Canada on how WSU has used the ACRL Best Practices guidelines to inform and improve our program.
The team has continued its use of the assessment plans for each type of information literacy instruction we provide. Faculty members have included information in their Faculty Activity Reports on how they have used assessment data to inform their teaching. The team revised the student end of course evaluation form for the LibSci 2201 course to incorporate more questions relating to our assessment outcomes.
Team members have also been actively involved in the Web usability studies, and in the Web redesign project. Link checking, moving and updating every page on the library Web has been enormously time consuming for team members this year.
The information literacy team has also been involved in the Association of Research Libraries SAILS (Standardized Assessment of Information Literacy Skills) assessment with ten other academic libraries. Over 370 WSU students took the SAILS test and we will get results, comparing our students scores to students across the country, later this year.
Demand for information literacy courses continues to grow and three new adjuncts were hired and trained to teach the Internet Navigator during Spring 2003.
Additional efforts were made by team members this year to support accreditation. Team members gathered data and wrote draft documents to support reports on the information literacy program and core general education requirements.


Information Literacy Data

  2002/2003 2001/2002 2000/2001 1999/2000

Instructional Sessions

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Sessions

Students

Subject Specific

117

2,419

159

2,902

163

3,045

134

2,529

English 2010

101

2,152

100

2,199

96

2,248

96

2,091

FYE (First Year Exp.)

29

609

19

383

28

595

35

727

  Other

33

442

24

260

46

970

36

498

                                  Totals:

280

5,622

302

5,744

333

7,191

301

5,845

  For Credit Classes

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

  Classes

Students

13

351

9

251

11

300

15

460

  Internet Navigator

18

2046

11

1173

7

523

Information Literacy Competency Exam Data
The information literacy competency exam has been continually improved with assistance from the TBE (Telecommunications and Business Education) department. Student comments have been much more favorable this Spring. The following table illustrates the data on the growth of the information literacy exams since Spring 2001. Carole Lapine, TBE Department, collects this data.

 
Registered
Total Retakes
Credit
Withdrew
No Credit
Spring 2001
177
50
133
3
44
Summer 2001
89
37
67
6
22
Fall 2001
253
58
149
4
100
Spring 2002
356
126
240
10
106
Summer 2002
85
1
61
1
24
Fall 2002
321
19
242
8
71
Spring 2003
382
79
276
5
101

Team members have been actively engaged in professional development and scholarship. The team organized a joint training session with Weber County librarians around a Patriot Act teleconference in December. Team members’ scholarship activities are included in the Scholarship section of the Annual Report; additionally Carol Hansen was selected as an Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Institute for Information Literacy Faculty Member, and received a distinguished service award from ULA..

Information Literacy Team Goals for 2003/04:

The team drafted long range goals based on the ACRL Best Practices for Information Literacy draft document:


Sustaining Outcome: Provide a comprehensive information literacy program for WSU students including, for credit, online and on demand instruction in order to graduate students with information literacy competencies.


Some of the goals accomplished by the Information literacy team this year include:

  • The information literacy program mission was reviewed during Fall 2002
  • Documents describing and charting its evolution were further developed for the Web and reviewed
  • Assessment plans were reviewed and revised as needed for each type of instruction
  • Assessment plans were reviewed and revised as needed updated and reviewed by the Team
  • Web Event, an automated, web based system for quickly and easily scheduling classrooms and instruction sessions was implemented
  • The information literacy team will develop a plan for integrating information on the new 24/7 live reference chat software throughout our curriculum
  • A new information literacy business course, LibSci 2704, was developed by the Business Librarian
  • A new tutorial on plagiarism and ethics was developed
  • Three new adjunct faculty were hired and trained to meet the growing demand for our courses
  • Information Literacy team has participated in Part I beta test of ARL/SAILS/Kent State information literacy competency multiple choice test. A first attempt at national benchmarking of information literacy skills
  • SNAP assessment software was implemented for end of course evaluations
  • A new, more outcomes assessment oriented, end of course evaluation was developed for Lib Sci 2201

    Challenges

    A major challenge this year was lack of staff with an unfilled faculty position. We look forward to hiring a new faculty member. Time is wasted by not having an automated method for scheduling our classrooms that also gathers instruction data. Scheduling and gathering of instruction statistics need to become more automated. Members of the information literacy team have difficulty finding the time to find, evaluate or set up new software or systems. This is an ongoing challenge.

    Team Goals for 2003/2004:

    Selected goals approved by the team for next year include:
    • Assist in planning for a new classroom
    • Find a better, easier and more secure, method to deliver and gather data from online student end of course evaluations
    • Assist with hiring new faculty and professional staff in order to increase numbers of faculty involved in information literacy team activities. By reducing faculty involvement in Eng2010 and FYE's faculty would have more time for subject specific sessions.
    • A marketing plan (or priorities) will be developed/identified for the Information Literacy program within the guidelines of the library’s marketing plan.

* * * * * * * * *

REFERENCE & INFORMATION SERVICES

Reference:

The Reference Team has begun the process of re-envisioning Reference Services & Information Services (RIS) to meet the needs of a changing environment.

Reference Services

Reference Desk use - Between 1998/99 when the University moved to semesters, and 2001/02, the number of reference/research questions answered at the desk dropped from 24,412 to 12,670 - a decrease of 48% overall. The trend slowed this year, with a total of 11,632 reference/research questions answered for an 8% decrease. This is a slower rate of decline than previous years and it is possible that we are moving towards a state of equilibrium.

Three trends continue to develop:

  1. There is an increasing polarity between simple directional questions and complex research questions. While the number of research questions has remained relatively constant, team members report an increase in complexity and time necessary to answer the questions. In the coming year, the team will explore methods of gathering statistics to confirm anecdotal reports.
  2. Along with an increasing polarity in types of questions comes an increasing polarity in the timing of questions. The current pattern is longer periods with few questions, followed by rushes. While some “rushes” correlate to class breaks, others do not and it creates staffing issues (see below).
  3. Use of library resources via remote access continues to increase. EZProxy has proven to be a stable, easy-to-use method of accessing resources. At this time all web-based library databases are available off-campus.

Finally, RIS continues to expand services to off-campus users. During the past semester, team members have made a commitment to respond more quickly to Ask A Librarian email queries. Turn around time at the end of the Spring 2003 semester averaged 2 hours and queries had increased by about 1/3. Stewart Library is also a member of the UALC chat reference service. The pilot service for the past year showed low use statistics (an average of 1 question per hour of service), probably due to the extremely limited hours. As of June 1, 2003, we have joined a national consortium and now offer Reference/Chat 24/7. We expect to see a significant increase in numbers over the next year. We also continue to provide telephone service with local, toll-free, and TTY numbers. We are exploring options for gathering meaningful statistics about telephone service.

Reference Desk Staffing - a number of intertwining factors impact reference desk staffing. These include:


1. There are many hours, particularly very early in the morning and very late in the evening, during which no questions are asked. We are addressing this in several ways. First, we single staff all hours except for class break periods. Secondly, this summer and fall we will try staffing the desk fewer hours, then assess the impact on both Reference and other service areas. While these changes may help, they do not address the issue of making staff time during low use periods both interesting and useful. We will begin to explore this issue in the coming semester.
2. The increasing complexity of research questions often calls for the expertise of a subject bibliographer. One reason we want to decrease desk hours is to allow more time for subject bibliographers to provide one-on-one research assistance. The Science Bibliographer will begin a pilot project of providing subject specific reference hours on location in her colleges in the fall. The Business & Economics Librarian has also been steadily increasing the amount of one-on-one research assistance she provides.
3. The increasing emphasis on electronic reference services also requires additional staffing. Present technology makes it impossible for the person at the desk to do Reference/chat. Decrease of reference desk hours should help to ease the burden.
4. Increasing instruction loads require more time from the same people who staff the reference desk. Decreasing desk hours, if it can be done without decreasing service levels, would help the situation.

Reference Area - Reference surveys have consistently rated reference services highly; however, anecdotal evidence and some survey comments suggest that patrons do not find the physical environment as welcoming as they find the staff. Changes in technology, particularly wireless networks, have also rendered the current arrangement unnecessary. Finally, long periods when the computers are idle argues for an arrangement that would maximize use of computer and other reference resources.

The team began discussions of possible rearrangements (and possible sources of outside funding). The general goal is to create a welcoming, community atmosphere for patrons. Suggestions include:

1. Take advantage of wireless networks to scatter the computers throughout the reference area, creating different areas for word processing, email, group, and solo research.
2. Check-out laptops for group presentation preparation and practice, also provide easels, projectors, etc.
3. Provide an area for faculty to meet and work with students.
4. Remove at least part of the index tables and downsize the reference shelving area to provide more study room.
5. Provide lockers.


Reference Patrons - Our patrons increasingly face time constraints due to work, family, classes, etc. Off-campus access figures continue to rise with the increasing ease of access to electronic resources, growing numbers of “wired” patrons, and increasing student familiarity with electronic resources. However the need to provide traditional service remains.

Our past two satisfaction surveys have shown that between 87-98% of those completing the survey indicated they were highly satisfied with reference services and resources (percentage varies with specific question). Our goal now is to investigate methods to improve services that might not have occurred to our patrons and to provide such services when and where they need it. Such service improvements might include:

1. Improving the environment of the physical reference area, as discussed above.
2. Providing “roving” or “spot” reference throughout the library, instead of focusing on the reference area.
3. Using video phones and other emergent technology to provide one-on-one reference assistance.
4. Exploring the use of web technologies, such as blogs and Weber specific chat programs to provide more specialized local service.

Marketing Reference Services - Marketing has become somewhat of a buzzword, but it is also increasingly important for libraries to ensure that patrons know what resources and services they offer. Library surveys and anecdotal evidence suggest that few patrons understand the wide range of services and resources currently available. During the coming year, the RIF team will devote more time and effort to informing patrons of our resources and services.

Reference Services Goals for 2003-2004


1. To re-engineer Reference Services to serve patrons better and to use staff more effectively in a changing and increasingly wired environment by:


a. Reallocating staff time so that faculty have more time to provide specialized reference assistance, liaison and instruction
b. Rearranging the physical Reference area to provide a more welcoming environment
c. Reconfiguring electronic systems in the reference area to better meet patron and staff needs
d. Reorganizing services to better serve patrons
e. Working to develop methods of assessing not just patron satisfaction, but also patron needs they might not recognize, as well as our success at meeting such needs
f. Increasing marketing of Reference services and resources
g. Developing a program of professional development for Reference Team members

Electronic Resources: The reallocation of a professional staff member to the position of Electronic Resources Coordinator (ERC) and the development of an Electronic Resources Policy and Procedure have allowed us to begin to bring order out of chaos.


1. Our ERC, Lonna Rivera, has done a magnificent job in setting up a database for ejournals, to allow us to see and control what we have. She has also acted as a liaison with Bibliographic Services resulting in several thousand ejournals being added to the library’s catalog.
2. Serials Solutions continues to provide us with access to the great number of electronic journals we have available through various databases and vendors. They will shortly add links to our library catalog for print holdings, limiting the number of places patrons must look for information.
3. A database has been developed to track such things as vendor, cost, user limits, renewal policies and the like for our electronic databases. Data is currently being added.
4. The great majority of our electronic resources, over 150 databases, are now available via the web and from off-campus. The few resources remaining on CD-ROM have not yet been made available via the web.
5. The library continues to add remotely accessible databases to support on-campus and on-line programs. Recent and new acquisitions include Morningstar, ValueLine, Mergent, and Reuters to support courses in the School of Business and Economics, as well as ERIC Documents Online to support Education and the Kodansha Encyclopedia of Japan to support Asian Studies.

Note: Given the increasing technological sophistication of our current website, responsibility for it was transferred to Systems, Fall 2002.

Electronic Resources Goals for 2003-2004:

1. Continue to work with Bibliographic Services to add ejournals to the library catalog.
2. Finish the database of electronic databases.
3. Work to market our resources to increase patron awareness of their availability.

Reference Collection Management: The Reference Team continues to maintain a strong print reference collection. For electronic resources, see above.

Reference Collection Management Goals for 2003-2004:


1. Begin weeding the collection.
2. Identify any remaining weak areas and buy materials necessary to enhance them.

WSU Davis Library: The past year has been spent planning for the opening of the new Davis Campus branch library. At this point, the physical arrangement of the library has been set. A basic circulating collection has been purchased and a reference collection is being developed. Subscriptions to commonly used periodicals have been ordered. Two new positions have been created: Coordinator, Stewart Library - Davis Campus and an Evening-Weekend Supervisor. The position descriptions have been written and the Coordinator position has been advertised. Anticipated start date is July 1. The classified Evening/Weekend Supervisor position will be filled during July. Supplies are being ordered and the process of writing policies and procedures has begun.

WSU Davis Library Goals for 2003-2004:

1. Finish necessary policies and procedures.
2. Work with other stakeholders in the Information Commons to coordinate services.
3. Open Library with expanded hours.
4. Market library to Davis campus community.
5. Assess success of current offerings and identify needs.

Government Publications: the Federal Depository Library Program continues to move from paper to electronic documents. We continue to work to improve access to web-based materials. We had planned to provide networked access to the most popular CD-ROMS, however, improved web access has made this unnecessary. As a result, we decided to catalog CD-ROMS so that patrons could check them out. This has been done. We have also added campus networked and print access to Hill Air Force Base environmental impact data.

Government Publications Goals for 2003-2004:

1. Continue to improve access to government publications electronically.
2. Continue to work to publicize and market the great number and wide variety of resources available from the government.
3. Begin weeding the paper collection.

Assessment: Assessment continues to be important for Reference and Information Services. The Team completed a second Satisfaction Survey last fall. As with the previous survey, between 87-98% of users indicated they were highly satisfied with reference services and resources (percentage varies with specific question). We also did a brief survey to allow individual librarians to judge their effectiveness. Team members felt that the mini-survey provided useful insight about their service.

In the coming year we would like to focus more on determining patron needs, perhaps by means of focus groups.

Assessment Goals for 2003-2004:

1. Work to develop assessment methods that will allow us to determine currently unidentified patron needs.
2. Survey patron needs and satisfaction levels at the new Davis Campus facility.
3. Assess patron views of pilot reference hours.
4. Try to determine a method for developing useful feed back about telephone service.
5. Try to determine a method to measure question complexity.
6. Begin work on developing an overall assessment plan for all areas of Reference & Information Services.

* * * * * * * * *

SYSTEMS and ACCESS SERVICES

User Satisfaction Overview
Assessment of user satisfaction with library resources and services is undertaken on a regular basis. In addition to information gathered from the annual Noel-Levitz Student Satisfaction Inventory administered by the university, the library collects data with biennial User Satisfaction Surveys of faculty and students. The most recent survey of student users was conducted in October of 2002. A summary of responses to the surveys distributed in each of the Systems & Access Services components (except Interlibrary Loan) is attached. A comparison between the “highlights” of the 2000 and 2002 surveys is given below:

Individual Service Areas

Circulation Services

  • 3M Self-check System
    42% of respondents in the 2002 survey were satisfied with the system whereas only 40% had expressed satisfaction in 2000. 59% in 2002 and 62% in 2000 had no opinion, which may indicate nothing more than lack of use.
  • Internet Service
    55% and 44% respectively were satisfied with or had no opinion about the option to extend a library loan via the Net. In 2000 36% were satisfied and 51% had no opinion.
  • Weekday Service Hours
    0% expressed dissatisfaction and 93% expressed satisfaction in the 2002 survey, whereas 3% of respondents expressed dissatisfaction with the hours in 2000.
  • Late Return/Lost Item fees
    As in 2000, the greatest dissatisfaction was expressed for the library’s late return and lost item fees. However, improvement is evident even in this case. In 2000 12% were dissatisfied with the lost item fee and 21% felt similarly about the late return fee. In 2002 those percentages were reduced to 4% and 9% respectively.

Interlibrary Loan Services

Since this area was not included in the 2000 survey no comparisons are possible. Though the 2002 surveys give uniformly favorable ratings, the small number of responses makes the data less useful. In the future the survey will be conducted via the Net and in-house over a longer period of time.

Media/Reserve Services

  • Personnel
    Satisfaction with the friendliness and approachability of personnel, the quality of assistance, and the appropriateness of referrals was virtually unchanged between the 2000 and 2002 surveys. Less than 1% of expressed any level of dissatisfaction.
  • ERreserve System
    75% of respondents were satisfied with the EReserve system, compared to 59% in 2000. 22% of respondents in 2002 and 41% in 2000 had no opinion about the system.
  • Collections
    Satisfaction with the content of the CD, Video and Curriculum collections showed little change between 2000 and 2002. There was an 8% gain in the satisfaction level for the content of the Young People’s collection. 40% gave no opinion about the content of these collections.

The Student Computer Lab(has moved to Lampros Hall)

  • Overall Improvement
    Of the service areas surveyed, the Lab showed the greatest overall gains in level of user satisfaction. Of particular note were increases in satisfaction with the friendliness of staff, quality of assistance, number and quality of PCs, access to a scanner and zip drives, and the overall suitability of the work stations

All Access Service Areas

As noted in the following table the satisfaction level has remained fairly stable since 2000. Differences are explained, in part, by the total number of surveys completed for each survey period and the number of “dissatisfied”or “no opinion” responses. The 13% difference in the satisfaction rating for weekend hours is more a reflection of “no opinion” responses than “dissatisfaction” with the hours. In fact, there has been a 1% decrease in the level of dissatisfaction in this category between 2000 and 2002.

Service or attribute

Satisfaction Rating 2000

Satisfaction Rating 2002

Services in general

98%

95%

Friendliness and approachability of personnel

96%

92%

Thoroughness of the assistance provided

92%

92%

Weekday service hours

95%

93%

Weekend service hours

97%

84%

Photocopying/printing facilities

85%

80%

Use Statistics Overview

Circulation

  • The Library sustained a 2% increase in the loan of print and media materials. Loans of books and periodicals increased by 9% and 32% respectively.
  • Internal use of materials declined by 7.5%.
  • 3M Self-Check system use remained below 10% of total borrowing transactions.

Document Delivery (Print, Media and Electronic)

  • Media document delivery requests increased by 6%.
  • Print document delivery requests decreased by 46%.
  • Electronic document delivery requests increased by 85%.

Interlibrary Loan

  • Interlibrary lending increased by less than 1%.
  • Borrowing requests received and filled decreased by approximately 7.5%.

Media

  • Video use increased by 34%
  • CD use increased by 24%.

Reserve: Electronic

  • The number of instructors using Electronic Reserve remained constant but the number of items processed increased by 35% and a 124% increase in the number of items returned (delivered) to faculty.
  • Ereserve material use (as measured by page hits) increased by 105%

Reserve: Print/Media

  • The number of instructors using Print/Media Reserve increased by 10% over the same period last year. The number of items processed increased by 3%.
  • Use of Print Reserve material declined by 24%.
  • Media Reserve material use increased by 7%

Websire Use

  • Visits to the Library homepage increased by 31% during the report period.. WebTrends software tabulated 232,435 sessions this year and 159,479 for the same time period in 2002.

Material Storage Overview

  • Collection growth remained constant during the current reporting period. In terms of stacks management this means that less linear feet of ever diminishing primary shelving and remote storage space was consumed at a slower rate. Areas of concern continue to be storage of Microforms, the pace of growth in the Media collections, and limited remote storage space.


Stacks Management - Collection Storage:

  • Growth of the print collections continues at about the 3% level, consuming shelf space at a rate of 1100 linear feet per year. The addition of shelving to the General/Periodicals Collection increased the amount of available shelf space to 10,112 feet. This represents an 24% increase in the amount of shelving available on the 2nd and lower levels. Areas of highest growth in the General/Periodicals Collection are sections C, L, N, and T
  • Growth of the nonprint collections was approximately 4%; 8% increase in the number of videos added; 20% increase in the number of CDs
  • 31% of total remote storage space remains available for use
Student Assistant Budget Conservation

For the past several years Access Services Coordinators have done a commendable job of spending less than allocated to their combined student assistant budget. This has been accomplished by hiring a minimal number of student assistants and a concerted effort to hire work-study students whenever possible. As in past years, however, savings in the Access Services budget have been used to cover a shortfall in the student assistant budget allocated to the Library’s Student Computing Lab. Since all student assistant s in the Lab are paid at a higher rate, and since too many of the assistants have been hourly rather than work-study, it is expected that all student assistant funds for both Access Services and the Computer Lab(has moved to Lampros Hall) will be expended by June 30. During the new fiscal year, a greater effort will be made to hire work-study rather than hourly student assistants in the Lab. In addition, Access Services will again be encouraged to “make do” with a minimal number of student assistants overall, and to hire work-study student assistants whenever possible.

Service Additions and Enhancements Overview

Access Services

  • Completed the annual inventory of the Curriculum, General/Periodicals, Media, Microforms, Reference, Remote Storage and Young People’s
  • Organized the Microforms collections into LC Call No. order and shifted the contents to accommodate growth
  • Coordinated the relocation of the “M” section of the General/Periodicals Collection to the lower level
  • Added shelving and shifted the General/Periodicals Collection on the 2nd level to accommodate growth
  • Conducted space analysis for the Government Publications and General/Periodicals collections
  • Compiled use statistics for evenings and weekends
  • Converted the Periodical Statistics file from Quattro to Excel
  • Actively participated in Library Marketing Strategy Development, Website Usability Studies, and planning for the Library at WSU-Davis Assisted Reference personnel and Subject Bibliographers

Systems

  • Configured and customized new Horizon Information Portal (iPAC 2x)
  • Configured new web server for library.weber.edu (to be implemented 07/03)
  • Configured and customized ILLiad interlibrary loan system
  • Updated Horizon server and modules
  • Updated critical software and hardware on production systems
  • Revised and enhanced library website
  • Coordinated and fostered continuing improvements to the library homepage
  • Maintained and enhanced classroom and Reference facilities
  • Coordinated development of a Systems Suite on the 2nd level
  • Updated staff workstation hardware/software as needed
  • Implemented GIS workstation for Science Librarian
  • Compiled statistics on use of electronic resources
  • Implemented security systems as appropriate
  • Implemented SAILS authentication project
  • Served as Technical Support for Utah Library Association Conference
  • Participated in preparations for the implementation of WebCT on campus.

Personnel Changes

  • The position of Web Administrator was added to Systems
  • The half-time Access Services Evening/Weekend Assistant was increased to full-time status and assigned half-time responsibility in Reference Services

Systems & Access Services Goals: 2003-2004

1. In support of the Library’s ongoing goal to: Leverage existing and emerging technology to foster the development of Library programs, services, and collections which support scholarship, research, academic success and community enhancement.

Systems’ objective:   Develop a technology plan to guide life-cycle management of computing resources, the systematic implementation of new technology-based resources, and the strategic replacement of existing technology-based resources in the Library.

Access Services’ objective:  Fully implement the ILLiad system and enhancement of the EReserve system.

2. In support of the Library’s ongoing goal to: Support the instructional, scholarship, and community service mission of the university by continuing to improve library collections and services and systematically assessing their use and relevancy.


Access Services’ objective:  Implement the circulation of media material to WSU students, faculty and staff and revise Access Services policies and procedures to reflect service enhancements.

Systems’ objective:  Promote the inclusion of online library resources and services in the University’s web-based and web-enhanced learning systems.

3. In support of the Library’s ongoing goal to: Augment library funding by increasing private donations.


The System & Access Services Librarian's objective:  Foster the development of grants to support the maintenance of existing, and encourage the implementation of new, technology-based library resources and services.

* * * * * * * * *

Updated November 18, 2004 . Please send comments to Joan Hubbard, University Librarian.
Weber State University, Stewart Library. Copyright © 2014 All Rights Reserved.

Stewart Library - Weber State University - Ogden, Utah 84408. (801) 626-6403 - Copyright © 2008 ALL Rights Reserved